Charles A. Lamberton is a leading Pittsburgh employment discrimination lawyer and wrongful termination attorney. He has recovered millions of dollars for his clients. His cases have been covered in several major news media, including the San Francisco Chronicle the Los Angeles Times, the Washington, Post, Forbes Online and the Miami Herald. Mr. Lamberton is a member of Employer Support for the Guard and Reserve, a Department of Defense agency that protects employees who serve their Country.

PRACTICE AREA:
Pittsburgh Employment and Labor Law Firm
Discrimination Attorneys Pittsburgh
Pittsburgh Sexual Harassment Lawyers

CONTACT:
Lamberton Law Firm, LLC
707 Grant Street, 1705 Gulf Tower
Pittsburgh, PA 15219
Phone: 412-258-2250
Fax; 412-258-2249
Business Email: cal@lambertonlaw.com









Sexual harassment can make a woman feel powerless. But you can take back your power and we can help. Call, email or text us if you have been sexually harassed at work. And in the meantime, remember these tips:

Speak up. Tell the harasser his conduct is not professional and not welcome. Do it in a text or an email. And tell him if he doesn’t stop, the next person you contact will be HR or his boss.

Consult your employer’s sexual harassment policy and do what it tells you to do. Your employer wants to know if sexual harassment is occurring. If you don’t tell it, it might never find out. Worse, if you wait and say nothing, it might later say you made your story up. So don’t fear reporting the harasser to HR or to upper management. And be specific about what the harasser said and did. If your supervisor is the harasser, take your complaint to his boss.

Keep a record of any harassment episodes, your complaints, and any incidents related to the harassment — including dates, times, persons involved, and what was said.

You have a right to work without being sexually harassed. Don’t be afraid to reach out for help. Contact us today.


The Pittsburgh Post Gazette has unfairly and naively criticized Pittsburgh Mayor Bill Peduto for his efforts to persuade Amazon to locate its second headquarters in the Steel City. His plan is too secretive, the newspaper says, as though business negotiations of this kind are conducted publicly. They aren’t. Preliminary plans and negotiations are always confidential, and yes, that’s true even when one of the parties is a public entity. Even the Post Gazette must acknowledge that the Peduto Administration is one of the most open and transparent in the Country. Spend 10 minutes on the City’s website and you will find a trove of information ready for any curious resident to download and read. Want to see who testified on such and such date before City Council? You can because the City posts videos of Council meetings. Want to see every last line item in the City’s budget? You can download that information with the click of a mouse. Bill Peduto, his staff and other community leaders should be praised for making a proposal that edged out the majority of other competitors and secured Pittsburgh a spot on Amazon’s list of 20 finalists. If Amazon chooses Pittsburgh, it will become the City’s second largest employer, and will bring with it a diverse, skilled, well paid and youthful workforce, making an instant impact and propelling Pittsburgh forward as it continues to evolve into one of the most sophisticated tech centers in the world. And the only reason Amazon is even looking at Pittsburgh is because of the foresight and hard work of leaders like Bill Peduto. The PPG need not thank him, but its criticism of him is profoundly misplaced.


Epidemiologist Rebecca Thurston has spent years studying women who have suffered sexual abuse and harassment. She finds that over time, sexual harassment works like a poison, stiffening women’s blood vessels, worsening blood flow and harming the inner lining of their hearts. More than a dozen other studies show that sexual harassment causes physical symptoms such as headaches, gastrointestinal problems and disrupted sleep. Sexual harassment lasts for longer than six months in more than a quarter of cases, according to surveys of harassment in the military, which are required by law and therefore among the most comprehensive. During that period, a woman’s body reacts strongly: the immune system suffers, inflammation increases, and the body begins secreting higher levels of cortisol, which contributes to high blood pressure, high cholesterol, weight gain, impaired memory function and depression. The negative effects can linger for years.

One of the most comprehensive studies tracked 1,654 employees at an unnamed Midwestern university over the course of six years. The 2005 study, published in the Journal of Business and Psychology, found that those who experienced sexual harassment were more prone to sickness, illness and accident, and not just around the time they experienced the harassment. When researchers surveyed the group again years later, the harassment continued to have an enduring effect on their rates of illness, injury and accident.

The mental strain of harassment also often leads to depression, anxiety and other disorders. In recent years, studies have shown sexual harassment makes women more likely to drink as a way of coping. Harassed women are also more likely to develop eating disorders. Researchers have shown the harmful effects even trickle down to co-workers who witness or hear of the harassment, a phenomenon analogous to secondhand smoke.

Among the most debilitating effects is post-traumatic stress disorder. A 2015 study found that 20 percent of female veterans of the Vietnam War suffered from PTSD – not because of the war itself but largely due to sexual harassment they suffered from their male counterparts.


What is workplace sexual harassment? Sexual harassment in the workplace is an umbrella term that encompasses a range of unwanted behaviors. This includes nonphysical harassment, including suggestive remarks and gestures, or requests for sexual favors. Physical harassment includes touches, hugs, kisses and coerced sex acts. It can be perpetrated by anyone — a manager, a colleague, a client. The perpetrator or the recipient may be male or female. It does not need to occur inside the office. Your employer could still be responsible for failing to prevent the sexual harassment, or for failing to handle it appropriately.

If you have experienced or witnessed sexual harassment and you want to take action, you have a number of choices. But first:
Whatever you plan to do, keep notes and evidence. After an incident of sexual harassment it important to write down what
happened, what was said or touched, who did it, whether anyone was around to witness what happened, where you were, what the time was. Take screenshots of texts, print emails, do what you need to do. Keep notes in a bound notebook do not store information on any of your devices. If there is any physical evidence — for example, a dress with fluids on it or pornographic images — save it. When investigating or reporting on a complaint of sexual harassment, accusers will often be asked if they had confided in a friend, family member or colleague at the time of the event or events. Even if you never plan on taking action, confiding in someone at the time can be helpful if you change your mind about taking action
later.

Now, for your options:

1. Contact an experienced sexual harassment lawyer immediately. Typically, you only have 180 days from the last act of sexual harassment to file a complaint with the appropriate federal or state agency. Don’t delay on this. Sexual harassment lawyers typically work on a contingent fee basis so that you are not paying by the hour.

2. File a criminal complaint. But do this in consultation with your sexual harassment attorney. Generally, in cases where the harassment included physical touching, coerced physical confinement or coerced sex acts, it could be considered a crime.

3. Notify your employer verbally and then in writing. Consult your employee handbook for your employer’s sexual harassment policy and follow the steps it sets forth. If the harasser was your boss, report to someone up the chain or to Human Resources. Reporting to your employer is critical because if you think you may want to file a lawsuit against the employer in the future, you have to report the harassment to your employer first. Otherwise, the employer has a defense. Make sure all of your attempts at reporting the sexual harassment are documented. Write down everything and put everything in writing.
4. You can go to a federal, state or local agency. At the federal level, you can go through the Equal Employment Opportunity Commission. In Pennsylvania, the state agency is the Pennsylvania Human Relations Commission. Filing a Charge or Complaint with these agencies is required before you can file a lawsuit in court. Your sexual harassment lawyer will help you with this process.



                                        



Today the U.S. Equal Employment Opportunity Commission (EEOC) launched an EEOC Public Portal to provide online access to individuals inquiring about discrimination.

“This secure online system makes the EEOC and an individual’s charge information available wherever and whenever it is most convenient for that individual,” said EEOC Acting Chair Victoria A. Lipnic. “It’s a giant leap forward for the EEOC in providing online services.”

The EEOC Public Portal allows individuals to submit online initial inquiries and requests for intake interviews with the agency. Initial inquiries and intake interviews are typically the first steps for individuals seeking to file a charge of discrimination with EEOC. In fiscal year 2017, the EEOC responded to over 550,000 calls to the toll-free number and more than 140,600 inquiries in field offices, reflecting the significant public demand for EEOC’s services. Handling this volume of contacts through an online system is more efficient for the public and the agency as it reduces the time and expense of paper submissions.

The new system enables individuals to digitally sign and file a charge prepared by the EEOC for them. Once an individual files a charge, he or she can use the EEOC Public Portal to provide and update contact information, agree to mediate the charge, upload documents to his or her charge file, receive documents and messages related to the charge from the agency and check on the status of his or her charge. These features are available for newly filed charges and charges that were filed on or after Jan. 1, 2016 that are in investigation or mediation.

Five EEOC offices (Charlotte, Chicago, New Orleans, Phoenix and Seattle) piloted the new system for six months. Feedback from the public and the EEOC pilot offices led to improvements in the system for this nationwide launch.

The new system does not permit individuals to file charges of discrimination online that have not been prepared by the EEOC or to file complaints of discrimination against federal agencies.

In the next few weeks, the EEOC will also provide online access to charging parties for whom the agency has an email address, who have pending charges that are currently in investigation or mediation and were filed as of Jan. 1, 2016.

Individuals who do not have online access can call 1-800-669-4000 to get basic information about how to submit an inquiry to their local EEOC office.

Tags: Charge of Discrimination, EEOC

Pittsburgh Employment Discrimination & Wrongful Termination Lawyers


Charles A. Lamberton is a leading Pittsburgh employment discrimination lawyer and wrongful termination attorney. He has recovered millions of dollars for his clients. His cases have been covered in several major news media, including the San Francisco Chronicle the Los Angeles Times, the Washington, Post, Forbes Online and the Miami Herald. Mr. Lamberton is a member of Employer Support for the Guard and Reserve, a Department of Defense agency that protects employees who serve their Country.

Mr. Lamberton graduated with honors from the University of Pittsburgh School of Law, where he

studied the law of employment discrimination and received the CALI Excellence for the Future Award in Trial Advocacy. Prior to attending law school, Mr. Lamberton received a degree in Economics from Saint Olaf College.

EDUCATION
  • JD - Juris Doctorate - University of Pittsburgh School of Law- 1996
  • B.A.- Bachelor of Arts - Saint Olaf College - 1993

ASSOCIATIONS:
  • National Employment Lawyers Association - Member- 2001 - Present
  • Western Pennsylvania Employment Lawyers Association - Vice Chair - 2015 - 2016
  • Allegheny County Bar Association, Labor and Employment Law Section - Vice Chair - 2014 - 2015
  • Federal Bar Association - Chair - Young Lawyer's Division - 2004 - 2005

AWARDS:
  • Super Lawyer - Pennsylvania Super Lawyers - 2010
  • Super Lawyer - Pennsylvania Super Lawyers - 2006

CONTACT:
Lamberton Law Firm, LLC
707 Grant Street, 1705 Gulf Tower
Pittsburgh, PA 15219
Phone: 412-258-2250
Fax; 412-258-2249
Business Email: cal@lambertonlaw.com